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Course Descriptions

The following is a list of ALL courses offered by the Department of Music. To view courses offered for the current and upcoming semesters, please use the “Related Resources” links in the left sidebar.

Course Level: 1000 | 2000 | 3000 | 4000 | 6000 | 7000 | 9000

MUSIC 1100: Elements of Musical Notation (first 4 week course)
Staff. 1 credit.
This four-week course, given at the beginning of each semester, fulfills the requirement of basic pitch, rhythm, and score-reading skills needed for some introductory courses and 2000-level courses with prerequisites.

MUSIC 1101: Elements of Music
A. Hicks. 3 credits.
This course offers a diverse set of approaches to five “elements” of musical activity: pitch, timbre, harmony, rhythm, and form. Its focus is the act of deliberate and practiced listening, which we will apply to a broad range of sounds, traditions, and ways of thinking and behaving musically, both familiar and unfamiliar, local and global. Through hands-on activities we will explore the complex history of these seemingly elementary concepts with three questions in mind: How has the human experience of musically organized sound changed along with changing technologies of sound production and music making? How are those experiences culturally specific? And how do cultural, technological, and economic forces shape why we listen, when we listen, and what we listen to?

MUSIC 1105: Introduction to Western Music Theory
J. Spinazzola. 3 credits.
A self-contained introduction to theories of notated Western concert (“classical”) music and related ideas found in jazz, rock, film, other popular forms, and traditional folk genres. Fundamentals of pitch (melody, harmony, counterpoint, tuning), time (rhythm and form), and other parameters (including timbre and instrumentation). Application of music notation, and implications on technique and analysis. The history and science of music theory. “Western” music theory in context, and contemporary approaches.

Music 1107: Introduction to Improvisation
P. Merrill. 3 credits.
An introduction to music improvisation: the study and performance of diasporic traditions from North America, South America, and the Caribbean with a focus on popular music and the blues. Previous experience in music making is not required. Singing or playing a tonal instrument is required. Concurrent enrollment in MUS 1100 Elements of Musical Notation may be necessary. 3 credits

MUSIC 1201: European Music from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque
N. Zaslaw. 3 credits.
This listening-intensive course will introduce students to key styles in European art music from before 1750 through a focus on several important musical centers at different historical moments: medieval Paris (chant, organum, monophonic songs), 15th-century Burgundy (sacred and secular polyphony), late 16th-century Mantua (madrigals, instrumental genres, early opera), late 17th-century Versailles (court ballet, instrumental suite), Leipzig around 1740 (organ music, cantata), and London around 1750 (concerto, opera, oratorio).  Works by composers such as Perotin, Dufay, Monteverdi, Bach, and Handel will be studied within the cultural contexts that allowed them to flourish.

MUSIC 1202: Classical Music 1750 to the Present
R. Harris-Warrick. 3 credits.
A survey of Western art music in many genres, with emphasis on listening.  Composers whose work is studied include Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Chopin, Wagner, Verdi, Liszt, Brahms, Mahler, Debussy, Stravinsky, Bartok, Ives, Webern, Messiaen, Bernstein, Stucky, and Sierra.

MUSIC 1301: Music in the African Diaspora (also LSP 1301 & LATA 1301)
C. Appert. 3 credit.
This course centers on folk, popular, and traditional musical genres of the Western Hemisphere, particularly the African diaspora. It examines both the elements of musical styles and the features of society that influence music. Listening and writing assignments are major components of the course.

MUSIC 1312: History of Rock Music (also AMST 1312)
J. Peraino. 3 credits.
This course examines the development and cultural significance of rock music from its origins in blues, gospel, and Tin Pan Alley up to alternative rock and hip hop. The course concludes with the year 2000.

MUSIC 1313: A Survey of Jazz (also AMST 1313)
S. Pond. 3 credits.
This course addresses jazz from two perspectives: the various sounds of jazz, as well as the historical streams-musical and cultural-that have contributed to its development. Listening and writing assignments are major components of the course.

MUSIC 1320: Music of Latin America  (also LATA 1320)
R. Sierra. 3 credits.
This course examines the diverse music of Latin America, covering traditional, popular, and classical repertoire. Listening and discussion will focus on the most significant musical developments from early colonial times to the present.

MUSIC 1321: Music of Mexico and the Mexican Diaspora (also AMST 1321, LSP 1321, SPAN 1321)
A. Madrid. 3 credits. 
This class is a survey of music practices among Mexican communities both in Mexico and in the U.S. Taking contemporary musical practices as a point of departure, the class explores the historical, cultural, and political significance of a wide variety of Mexican music traditions (including indigenous, folk, popular, and art music, dating back to the 16th Century) from a transnational perspective.

MUSIC 1330: African Music (also ASRC 1330)
C. Appert. 3 Credits.
This course introduces contemporary musical practices – both “traditional” and popular – from throughout Africa. It addresses the diversity of indigenous musics, the impact of migration and trade on the African continent, and the role of colonialism and postcolonial nationalist movements in developing urban popular and religious genres. Through close readings of scholarly and news sources, musical recordings, and documentary films – and through participation in a variety of workshops and performances – students will explore music’s role in negotiating historic and contemporary political, economic, and health crises, and will critically examine the relationship between musical performance and global representations of Africa.

MUSIC 1341: Gamelan in Indonesian History and Cultures (also ASIAN 2245, VISST 2744)
C. Miller. 3 credits.
No previous knowledge of musical notation or performance experience necessary.
An introduction to Indonesia through its arts. The course combines hands-on instruction in the performance of gamelan music and the academic study of a broader range of Indonesian music in its sociocultural context.

MUSIC 1421: Introduction to Computer Music
K. Ernste. 3 credits.
Limited enrollment.
A composition-based introduction to computer hardware and software for digital sound and digital media. Fundamentals of MIDI sequencing and other techniques for producing electroacoustic music. Each student creates several short compositions.

MUSIC 1465: Computing in the Arts (also CS/ENGRI 1610, PMA 1640, PSYCH 1650)
For description, see CS 1610.

MUSIC 1466: Physics of Musical Sound (also PHYS 1204)
For description, see PHYS 1204.

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2000

MUSIC 2006: Punk Culture: The Aesthetics and Politics of Refusal
J. Peraino, T. McEnaney. 4 credits.
Punk Culture-comprised of music, fashion, literature, and visual arts-represents a complex critical stance of resistance and refusal that coalesced at a particular historical moment in the mid-1970s, and continues to be invoked, revived, and revised. In this course we will explore punk’s origins in New York and London, U.S. punk’s regional differences (the New York scene’s connection to the art and literary worlds, Southern California’s skate and surf culture, etc.), its key movements (hardcore, straight edge, riot grrrl, crust, queercore), its race, class and gender relations, and its ongoing influence on global youth culture. We will read, listen, and examine a variety of visual media to analyze how punk draws from and alters previous aesthetic and political movements.

MUSIC 2101: Theory, Materials and Techniques I
R. Moseley. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: basic ability to read/write music and to sing or play an instrument, as evaluated by diagnostic exam (administered in first class meeting of semester), and/or instructor permission. Some students might also be advised to take  MUSIC 1100 – Elements of Musical Notation concurrently. Intended for students planning to major or minor in music, and other qualified students.

Study of the foundations of tonal music as conceived and practiced throughout eighteenth-century Europe. The course combines modern pedagogical methods with the study of relevant historical sources and incorporates active learning at the keyboard. Topics to be covered include rudiments such as scales and triads; melodic and harmonic principles; voice-leading strategies and schemata; species counterpoint; improvisation, including embellishment and the realization of solfeggi and partimenti; rhythm, meter, and the embodiment of social gestures; affect and topoi. At section meetings, the concepts and skills introduced in lecture will be practiced at the keyboard as well as vocally. Topics to be covered in sections include the rudiments of musicianship (musical literacy, intervallic production and identification, rhythmic accuracy and fluency, etc.); sight singing; score reading; and improvisation.

MUSIC 2102: Theory, Materials and Technique II
R. Moseley. 4 credits.
Prerequisites: MUSIC 2101 or equivalent.  Intended for students expecting to major in music and other qualified students. A grade of B- or better in MUSIC 2102 is required for admission to music major.
This course continues to survey the foundations of tonal music as conceived and practiced throughout eighteenth-century Europe. The course combines modern pedagogical methods with the study of relevant historical sources and incorporates active learning at the keyboard. Topics to be covered include modulation; melodic principles; voice-leading strategies; schema theory (and its application not only to eighteenth-century music but also to blues, folk, and pop); improvisation, including the realization of solfeggi and partimenti; rhythm, meter, and the musical embodiment of gestures; the study of topoi and social registers; and simple formal analysis.

MUSIC 2111: Songwriting
A. Lewandowski. 3 credits.
Permission of Instructor required.
This course aims to introduce students to the practice of songwriting through workshop formatted classes. Each unit will cover a particular area of songwriting, including lyrics, melody, harmony, rhythm, form, and arrangement. In addition to listening and reading assignments, students will be asked to compose new material weekly. Students work will be presented both in class and at an end of the semester concert.

MUSIC 2201: Introduction to Music Studies
J. Peraino. 4 credits.
This course introduces students to the study of music as an expression of history and culture by examining the ways in which music creates meaning, knowledge, archives, and identities. Musical examples will be drawn from a broad range styles, chronological periods, and geographical locations; and students will engage with live performance as well as various forms of recorded music and mediated performance.  Along with considering music as sound, the course will examine different modalities of writing about music—journalistic, academic, and creative—and we will think about how these musical texts, and those that the students produce, function to situate music as discourse. The course will develop critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills.

MUSIC 2207 : History of Western Music I
R. Harris-Warrick. 4 credits.
Prerequisite or corequisite: MUSIC 2101 or permission of instructor.
A survey of Western music and its social contexts from the beginning of notation (circa 900) to 1700. Topics include sacred chant, secular song, polyphony, madrigals, early opera, and the development of independent instrumental music. The course emphasizes listening and comprehension of genres and styles, and is intended for music majors and qualified nonmajors.

MUSIC 2208: History of Western Music II
N. Zaslaw. 4 credits.
Prerequisite or corequisite: MUSIC 2102 or permission of instructor.
This course, intended for music majors and suitably qualified non-majors, surveys the vast terrain and diverse topography of 18th- and 19th-century music across Europe and North America. Involving a comprehensive listening component alongside score study and a wide range of primary and secondary sources, the course is designed to develop students’ knowledge of repertory, musical institutions, and social practices; it also aims to equip them with the means to think critically about music and texts amid shifting historical contexts.

 

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MUSIC 2221: Bach and Handel
D. Yearsley. 3 credits.
Both composers created oeuvres of incomparable richness and diversity. By examining in depth selected masterpieces, this course hopes to offer new perspectives on the continued relevance and vital rewards of their music, both instrumental and vocal, sacred and secular.

MUSIC 2224: Mozart in History, History in Mozart (also HIST 2224)
Staff. 3 credits.
An exploration of the phenomenon that is Wolfgang AmadË Mozart, using historical documents to contextualize his life and works while using the extensive documentation of his life and works to learn about history.

MUSIC 2241: Music as Drama: An Introduction to Opera (also PMA 2633)
R. Harris-Warrick. 3 credits.
Opera has been enthralling audiences for 400 years; this course explores the multiple facets of its appeal. Using seven operas as the focus-chosen from different periods, national traditions, and styles-the class will examine the texts that have been turned into operas, the musical conventions that have guided composers (or against which they have worked), and the decisions directors make when they put operas on stage. Each work will be seen as well as heard-either in a special screening or, at least once in the semester, in a live performance. Students who have a strong background in music may wish to also enroll in MUSIC 3901, which involves an extra class-period per week where the music is discussed in greater detail. Permission of the instructor is required for this one-credit addition.

MUSIC 2244: The King of the Instruments: The Music, Art, and Technology of the Organ
A. Richards. 3 credits.
The organ is an interdisciplinary wonder where mechanics, architecture, acoustics, religion, philosophy, literature, as well as the musical arts and sciences meet. This course uses the organ to explore music’s relation to technology, history and culture, and in turn traces the technical and mechanical mysteries, and expressive possibilities, of the ‘King of Instruments’ across its long history.

MUSIC 2250: American Musical (also AMST 2105, ENGL 2150, PMA 2650)
For description, see PMA 2650

MUSIC 2260: Music of the 1960’s
B. Piekut. 4 Credits.
In this class, we will examine how musicians working in such genres as rock, jazz, folk, classical, soul, and experimental music responded and contributed to the major themes of the 1960s in the US: the counterculture, Vietnam, the civil rights movement, women’s liberation, and the space race. We will examine written texts, recordings, and films from the period. The ability to read music is not required.

MUSIC 2270: Thinking with Music
B. Piekut. 4 Credits.
In this course, we will explore how we use music: to construct ourselves, to construct others, and to construct societies. “Thinking with Music” is not an historical survey or a music appreciation course, but more of an investigation into several overlapping questions: How do we make distinctions between sound and music, or between music and noise? How does music contribute to systems of meaning? How do identity categories like gender and race form our experiences of music, and how does music contribute to our experiences of identity? How do music and sound relate to the operations of power, pleasure, violence, and desire? No previous formal study of music is required.

MUSIC 2280: Experimental Music
B. Piekut. 4 Credits.
An introduction to significant figures and movements in adventurous music since 1950. Topics will include the New York School, Fluxus, free jazz, the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, European free improvisation, electroacoustic improvisation, and art rock. The ability to read music is not required.

MUSIC 2308: The Sounds of Silent Film
M. Tootil. 4 Credits
The era of “silent” film was in fact anything but silent. How then did music shape the growth of this new medium? And where do we locate silent film—with its rich tradition of live performance—within cinematic and musical history? This course challenges the notion of film music as accompanimental by examining diverse approaches to scoring silent films, ranging from keyboard improvisations to visual symphonies. Our exploration of this medium will be framed by discussions of the influence of nineteenth-century musical culture and current film performances/showings, which will prompt us to question how our engagement today is shaped by (live) music. We will also investigate Ithaca’s place in the history of silent film in a collaborative community education project.

MUSIC 2320: Latino Music in the US (also AMST 2320, LSP 2320, SPAN 2320)
A. Madrid-Gonzalez. 3 Credits.
Music and dance cultures have been central topics of study in the development of Chicano studies, Puerto Rican studies, and Latino studies in general. From Americo Paredes to Frances Aparicio and from Jose Limon to Deborah Pacini-Hernandez, focusing on music and embodied culture through sound has allowed scholars to engage the wide variety of cultural experiences of the different ethnic groups usually described with the term “Latino.” Taking this scholarship as a point of departure, this class offers a survey of Latino music in the U.S. as a window into the political, cultural and social that struggles Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Brazilians, Colombians, and Central Americans have gone through while becoming hyphenated (Eg. Mexican-American, Cuban American, etc) or not, and into how these processes have continually challenged and enriched mainstream notions of “American identity.”

MUSIC 2340: The Beatles
J. Peraino. 3 credits.
The course will focus on the music of the Beatles and their impact on American and British culture in the 1960s to the present day. Topics include considerations of race, gender, class, sexuality, and the media in their rise to fame; the influence of the counter-culture, drugs, and other rock musicians, as well as Western and Indian classical music on their music and image; their perceived rivalry with the Rolling Stones; and their experimentation with recording technology. No pre-requisites.

MUSIC 2380: Performing Hip Hop
C. Appert. 3 credits.
This course is a hybrid seminar/performance forum that combines scholarly exploration of hip hop musical aesthetics with applied performance. Students will engage in online and in-class discussions of hip hop musical aesthetics, contextualized historically, socially, and culturally through weekly reading and listening assignments.  They will also devote significant time to creating and workshopping individual and collaborative musical projects. Formal musical training is not required, but students should have experience making music (instrumentalists, beat makers, lyricists, vocalists, beatboxers, etc.), and should have at least a basic familiarity with hip hop music. Students who wish to enroll in the course should contact the professor for more information.

MUSIC 2390: Hip Hop: Beats, Rhymes and Life
Staff. 3 credits.
In this University Course, students will investigate hip-hop history from several points of entry: chronological, political, aesthetic, industrial and others.  Team-taught by faculty from Africana Studies, English, and Music, Hip Hop: Beats, Rhymes, and Life will foster a dynamic exchange among different disciplinary viewpoints.  The historical focus of the course locates hip-hop both as a personal/interactive expression and as an expression of culture: how hip-hop affects, and is affected by, notions of ethnicity, class, nationalism, art, gender, and genre.  Throughout, we will focus our inquiry through listening to historical recordings, reading first-person and critical narratives, viewing a variety of media, and writing creatively and reflectively.  We will develop research, writing, performing, and productions skills associated with hip-hop’s major elements: break-dancing, graffiti writing, MC-ing, DJ-ing, and knowledge.  Informing this, we will make use of Cornell’s Kugelberg Hip-Hop Archive (the largest such archive in the United States) to query hip-hop as material culture.

MUSIC 2421: Computers in Music Performance
K. Ernste. 3 credits.
Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: Music 1421 or permission of instructor.
A course in live performance and real-time, interactive sound manipulation techniques.

MUSIC 2490: Hip Hop in Global Perspective
C. Appert. 3 Credits.
This course examines hip hop’s historic development in the United States and its global spread to Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.  We will explore how youth throughout the world increasingly draw on U.S. hip hop to address their own experiences of marginality, exploitation, and displacement, localizing the music in ways that potentially complicate dominant models of cultural globalization.

MUSIC 2642: The Art of Math: Mathematical Traditions of Symmetry and Harmony (also CLASS 2642)
A. Hicks, C Roby. 3 credits.
Symmetry and harmony are central aesthetic concepts built on a long history of mathematical exploration, not just in the European mathematical tradition but also in mathematical texts from China, India, and the Islamic world. This course will cover theoretical proofs and practical applications from geometrical, harmonic, and astronomical traditions ranging from ancient Greek geometry to early modern science. Topics include geometrical proofs, calculating systems, astronomical models, ratios and proportions, and scales and temperaments.

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3000

MUSIC 3111:  Jazz Improvisation I
P. Merrill. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 2101 or permission of instructor.
An introduction to fundamental jazz theory, technique, and applied skills.

MUSIC 3112: Jazz Improvisation II
P. Merrill. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 3111.
Continuation of jazz theory, technique, and applied skills. Class work and assignments emphasize altered upper-structures and dominants, chords and modes of melodic minor, harmonic minor, substitutions, and advanced rhythmic development. Performance, composition, analysis, transcribing, listening, and ear training.

MUSIC 3113: Jazz Improvisation III
P. Merrill. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 3112.
Class work and assignments emphasize Coltrane and post-Coltrane harmony, advanced rhythmic development, augmented vocabulary, and an introduction to playing “free.”

MUSIC 3115: Jazz Piano
P. Merrill. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 2101 or permission of instructor.
An introduction to jazz keyboard technique, intended primarily for jazz instrumentalists with little or no keyboard experience and pianists with little or no jazz experience.

MUSIC 3121: Choral Conducting
R. Isaacs. 3 credits.
This course will help students develop practical skills in conducting and leading rehearsals with singers. Prerequisite: ability to read music, and some previous singing experience. Students will work on developing clear, expressive gestures that convey their musical intent efficiently and support the singers in their own task. The course will also include discussion of store study and rehearsal preparation.

MUSIC 3205: Cultural Studies of Music 
A. Madrid. 4 Credits.
Discussion of basic cultural studies concepts through music; including concepts like class, race, gender, intertextuality, everyday life, representation, identity, consumption, community, subculture, and transculturation. Particular emphasis will be placed on questions of: immigration, orality, diaspora, technology, modernism/modernity, nationalism/transnationalism, postmodernism vs. postcoloniality, and the political economy of music.

MUSIC 3211: Seminar in Advanced Music Studies
B. Piekut. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 3101-3102, or permission of the instructor.
This course explores historical, critical, and aesthetic writings on music extending from Ancient Greece to contemporary America. We will engage with significant ways of thinking about music from the Western classical tradition and beyond it, building our skills as writers and speakers about the sonic arts in a range of cultural contexts.

MUSIC 3231: Topics in Western Art Music to 1750
Staff. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 2102 or permission of instructor.

MUSIC 3232: Topics in Western Art Music 1750-Present
N. Zaslaw. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 2102 or permission of instructor.
The orchestra has been a central institution in Western culture since the late 17th century. Its evolution over four centuries will be studied from social, political, technological, financial, anthropological and musical points of view. Attendance at live orchestral concerts is required.

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MUSIC 3303: Discovering Hip-Hop: Research and the Cornell Hip-Hop Collection
S. Pond. 3 credits.
Limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
The course addresses research issues and methodologies through the lens of Cornell’s Hip-Hop Collection, a gift of collector and author Johan Kugelberg, which is housed in Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections. The collection features a significant archive on the history of hip-hop and rap music, documenting its emergence in the Bronx in the 1970s and early 1980s. It includes sound recordings, a key photographic archive, textile art, books, magazines, and more than five hundred original flyers. The course provides students opportunities to gain new insights into hip-hop culture, while also introducing them to research and curatorial methodologies and goals.

MUSIC 3350: Introduction to Experimental and Improvised Music since 1950
B. Piekut. 4 credits.
An introduction to significant figures and movements in adventurous music since 1950. Topics will include the New York School, Fluxus, free jazz, the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, European free improvisation, electroacoustic improvisation, and art rock. The ability to read music is not required.

MUSIC 3360: Histories and Philosophies of Improvisation
M. Pierce. 3 credits.
Everyone improvises. Whether in jazz band or walking down the street, on the concert stage or through GarageBand, we all make music on the fly. Yet how and why people do so remains shrouded in mystery. Drawing on examples from jazz, experimental music, silent film accompaniment, hip-hop, and classical music, this course examines how improvisatory music is made and what it means. Why is improvisation unique, and by comparison, what does improvisation share with other forms of music making? Focusing on American examples, we will ask how improvised music channeled the social agency of its practitioners and gave voice to some of the most important social struggles of the last century. The ability to read music is not required.

MUSIC 3431: Sound Design (also PMA 3680)
For description, see PMA 3680.

MUSIC 3441: Interactive Performance Technology (also PMA 3690)
For description, see PMA 3690.

MUSIC 3470: Bollywood Songs and South Asian Culture
A. Desai-Stephens. 4 credits.
This course focuses on Bollywood, the largest film industry in the world, and explores the world of Hindi film songs. How have Hindi film songs and musical styles changed over the last half-century? What is the social life of filmi songs, both as they relate to and are independent from the films for which they are composed? Taking Hindi film songs as a guide to South Asian culture, we will examine issues such as gender, nationalism, and globalization. Combining literature on South Asian history, society, and music with film viewings and analysis of songs, we will develop a culturally grounded and musically sophisticated understanding of why these songs hold such meaning and appeal, both within South Asia and abroad.

MUSIC 3480: Brazilian Culture through Its Music
S. Pond. 4 credits.
Few areas of cultural expression can rise to the importance of music in Brazilian life. This seminar-style course employs discussion, critical reading and listening – and hands-on music-making – to investigate Brazilian culture, history, and politics through the lens of its music. Samba will be a significant focus, but we will also discuss a range of additional regional and national styles. Along with two class meetings per week, our “discussion” will coincide with rehearsals for Deixa Sambar, Cornell’s Brazilian ensemble. The course will be taught in English. Music experience is not necessary, but engagement in music-making is an integral part of the course.

MUSIC 3490: Hip Hop in Global Perspective
C. Appert. 3 credits.
This course examins hip hop’s historic development in the United States and its global spread to Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East. We will explore how youth throughout the world increasingly draw on U.S. hip hop to address their own experiences of marginality, exploitation, and displacement, localizing the music in ways that potentially complicate dominat models of cultural globialization.

MUSIC 3501 and 3502: Individual Instruction in Performance and Composition
Prerequisite: advanced students only; may register after successful audition with instructor, or, if student needs to study outside Cornell, with appropriate faculty sponsor. Students should contact instructor or music department office for audition information. Analogously to private instruction in performance, Cornell faculty members and outside instructors offer private instruction in musical composition.  Students may register for these courses in successive semesters or years. Music majors are granted a waiver of lesson fees. Click here for more information.

MUSIC 3513: Music and Choreography (also DANCE 3530) (LA-AS)
Attendance at dance concerts and music concerts required.
For description, see DANCE 3530.

MUSIC 3602: Chorus
R. Isaacs. 2 credits.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
A nationally renowned treble-voice chorus specializing in music for women’s voices. Tours and records annually. The Chorus frequently combines with the Glee Club to work on mixed-voice repertoire and major works.

MUSIC 3603: Glee Club
R. Isaacs. 2 credits.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
A nationally renowned male-voice chorus specializing in music for men’s voices. Tours and records annually. The Glee Club frequently combines with the Chorus to work on mixed-voice repertoire and major works.

MUSIC 3604: Chorale
S. Spinelli. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
A course for singers wishing to develop their musicianship, sightreading, and vocal technique. The Chorale may occasionally perform publicly but is more focused on the development of essential skills to a high level, preparing students for further singing in a cappella groups, the Chorus, the Glee Club, or the Chamber Singers.

MUSIC 3609: Deixa Sambar
S. Pond. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Deixa Sambar performs several styles of samba, Brazil’s national music.  Members need not have a prior background in music-making, but a good sense of rhythm is desirable.  Members include students as well as Ithaca community members, brasileiros as well as newcomers to Brazilian culture.  Rehearsals develop playing skills, with a deep emphasis on cultural understanding of this vital, community-based music.

MUSIC 3610: Gamelan Ensemble
C. Miller. 1 credit.
Recommended prerequisite: MUSIC 1341 – Gamelan in Indonesian History and Cultures is not an absolute prerequisite, but it or other relevant experience is recommended. Permission of instructor required.
Study and performance mostly of traditional Javanese gamelan music. Group rehearsal once a week in preparation for one concert. Individual instruction is offered as necessary; those wishing to learn advanced techniques should also enroll in MUSIC 4641 – Advanced Instruction in Gamelan.

MUSIC 3612: World Drum and Dance Ensemble
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MUSIC 3613: Cornell Steel Band
C. Miller. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of  instructor.
The Cornell Steel Bands perform traditional music from Trinidad for steel pans, including calypso and soca, as well as repertoire expanding the boundaries of the instruments. The group includes the standard steel pan orchestra, as well as an “engine room” consisting of drumset, congas, irons (brake drums), and other percussion instruments.

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MUSIC 3615: Jazz Ensemble
P. Merrill. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
Study and performance of classic and contemporary big band literature. Rehearsal once a week with one to two performances a semester.

MUSIC 3621: Cornell Symphony Orchestra
C. Kim. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.

Study and performance of a broad repertoire of orchestral works from Beethoven to the present.

MUSIC 3631: Wind Symphony
J. Spinazzola. 1 or 2 credits.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
Wind Symphony unites wind, brass, and percussion players who seek remarkable music making through the process of preparing and performing established and emerging wind repertoire in the large ensemble setting. By audition.

MUSIC 3633: Wind Ensemble
Prerequisite: successful audition; previous background in percussion.

MUSIC 3634: Cornell Percussion Group
Prerequisite: audition with instructor.  Co-requisite:  enrollment in a Cornell large ensemble (orchestras, wind ensemble/symphony, jazz bands, or choral group).  Previous background in percussion is required. 
The Percussion Ensemble performs pieces from the growing percussion repertory, exploring the breadth and depth of its possibilities for percussionists.  Concerts might involve collaborations with composers and other instrumentalists, improvisation, or student-initiated ideas for performance.

MUSIC 3660: Music Improvisation Ensemble
A. Lewandowski. 1 credit.
Co-requisite: successful audition.
The Music Improvisation Ensemble provides students with the opportunity to explore the elements of music from an improviser’s perspective. Each session will focus on a different area of improvisation, including noise, graphic scores, conducted improvisation, free music, small and large group improvisation, and interdisciplinary collaboration with dance and film. This ensemble is open to any level of musician. An audition is required at the beginning of the semester simply as a means of introduction

MUSIC 3901: Supplemental Study in Music History
Prerequisite: MUSIC 2101 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: enrollment in an approved 1000- or 2000-level 3-credit music history course.
Intended primarily for music majors, this option allows students enrolled in an approved 1000- or 2000-level 3-credit music history course to study the material at a more advanced level through supplementary reading, discussion, and writing, by arrangement with the professor.

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4000

MUSIC 4102: Topics in Music Analysis (also MUSIC 6101)
Staff. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 2101 or permission of instructor.
A critical survey of important analytical approaches to tonal music not covered in lower-level theory courses.  The topics will be selected from among the following, in part on the basis of student interest: phrase-rhythm; large-scale paragraph structure, especially in sonata-form expositions; structural-tonal (“Schenkerian”) voice-leading; thematic-motivic relations; and large-scale coherence in multimovement works.  Frequent assignments and class presentations.

MUSIC 4103: Topics in Post-Tonal Theory and Analysis (also MUSIC 7102)
Staff. 3 credits.

MUSIC 4111: Composition in Recent Style
R. Sierra. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Principles of composition, approached through traditional forms (variation, sonata) and through the imitation of specific 20th-century styles. May be taken more than once for credit, by permission and if taught by a different instructor.

MUSIC 4121: Advanced Conducting
C. Kim. 4 credits.
Intended to give students more experience with score study, rehearsal techniques and conducting vocabulary through weekly podium time and class discussion. Advanced conducting will continue topics covered in basic conducting(3121). Ear training in the context of being able to hear the score will be an integral part of the course. will be Basic knowledge of beat patterns and gestural vocabulary will be assumed and students will explore conducting in the orchestral, band, choral and mixed media.

MUSIC 4122: Orchestration
Staff. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Orchestration based on 19th- and 20th-century models.

MUSIC 4123: Jazz Arranging
P. Merrill. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: MUSIC 3111 or permission of instructor.
A survey of jazz arranging techniques for the big band.

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MUSIC 4181:  Psychology of Music (also PSYCH 4180/6180) (KCM-AS)
For description, see PSYCH 4180.

MUSIC 4222: Music and Monstrous Imaginings
A. Richards. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: ability to follow a musical score.
Explores the monstrous and fantastical in musical, literary, and visual culture around 1800. Topics include theory of Fantastic, Uncanny, Gothic, and Grotesque.

MUSIC 4260: Performance, Expressive Culture, and Globalization in the Americas
A. Madrid. 4 credits.Combining social and aesthetic theory in the study of embodied culture, the emerging discipline of performance studies provides a rich conceptual framework to understand a wide variety of phenomena, from activities that explicitly involve performance (eg. music, dance, theater, ritual) to discursive, social, and political performativity (eg. the construction of identities, the enunciative use of language, political activism, and the use of the body in everyday life). This seminar focuses on globalization and its impact on cultural production in the Americas, drawing on the particular insights of performance studies into these phenomena.

MUSIC 4301: Ethnography: Theory and Methods
C. Appert. 4 credits.
This course provides an introduction to ethnographic research and writing with a focus on their application in music studies. Students will critically examine the disciplinary history of ethnomusicology while exploring its methodological grounding in ethnography and musical analysis, broadly defined. In considering the possibility of a “musical anthropology” (Seeger 1987), we will interrogate textual, visual, and audio recording and analysis as practices of representation imbued with power and inflected by gender, sexuality, race, and class. Course materials include foundational texts in ethnomusicology, scholarly articles and chapters, ethnographic audio and visual recordings, and book length ethnographies.

MUSIC 4304: Imaging Music, Imagining Culture in Medieval Persia (also MEDVL 6307/4304, MUSIC 7304, NES 4304, RELST 4304)
A. Hicks. 4 credits.
This seminar investigates the nexus of music, poetry, cosmology, and iconography in medieval Arabo-Persian culture from, roughly, the Samanids (ninth/tenth century) to the Safavids (sixteenth/seventeenth century). Topics include the valuation of music and musicians, minstrels (mutriban) in particular, in Persian court culture (as filtered through the lenses of court poetry, illuminated manuscripts, and chronicles), musical metaphor and ritual in medieval Persian Sufism, and the development of “spiritual audition” (sama’/sema) in its expansion across Central Asia. These topics will be situated within the broader framework of contemporaneous debates about the morality of listening within Islam. No knowledge of Arabic or Persian required.

MUSIC 4306: Historic Performance Practice
N. Zaslaw. 4 Credits.
While students develop individual topics to investigate and present, the seminar as a whole will look into tempo in music in relation to 18th-century dance. Open to junior and senior music majors, who will meet jointly with Music 7501 plus one extra hour TBA.

MUSIC 4350: Culture and Representation in Borderlands (also LSP4350)
A. Madrid-Gonzalez. 4 Credits.
The borderlands are contact zones that could be defined geographically, politically, or even epistemologically as places where different cultures, lifestyles as well as understandings and experiences of the world meet and are constructed. Borders are highly contested sites and their representation plays a fundamental role in discourses of identity, from the national to the local and the personal. This seminar will engage a number of theoretical and ethnographic writings as well as cultural manifestations (music, films, literature, and TV shows) about the U.S.-Mexico border as well as other physical and cultural borderlands in order to contest the essentialisms that have controlled the representations of these areas and to show instead their fluidity and multi-sited nature. The seminar seeks to explore the borders as sites for opportunity and innovation in relation to transnational exchange, migration, and cultural flows.

MUSIC 4352: Medieval Cosmologies: Text, Image, and Music (also ARTH 4352/6352, CLASS 4753/7753, MEDVL 4352/6352, MUSIC 6352, NES 4352/6352, RELST 4352/6352, STS 4352/6352, VISST 4352)
A. Hicks, B. Anderson. 4 credits.
Cosmology can be understood as the search for order in the universe, for an underlying logic that structures and renders intelligible the raw chaos of sensory experience. In this sense, the production of cosmologies is not only a scientific or theoretical enterprise, but also has direct implications for religion, politics, and social ideology. We will adopt a broad approach to the study of the dominant cosmological models in the medieval Mediterranean (ca. 500-1500 C.E.), considering both their sources (Greco-Roman science, mythology, revealed religion, etc.) and their expressions in literature, art, and music.

MUSIC 4420: Electroacoustic Technique
K. Ernste. 4 credits.
Intended principally for doctoral students in music composition but open to others by permission. The course presents a practical overview of both classical and state-of-the-art techniques for computer music including digital synthesis, signal processing and sound manipulation, analysis and resynthesis, spatialization, and real-time and/or interactive applications. Students will produce several short studio projects as well as one larger piece to be presented in a final concert.

MUSIC 4501: Individual Instruction in Performance and Composition
3 credits.
Enrollment limited to: Music majors and music graduate students only.
May register after successful audition with instructor, or, if student needs to study outside Cornell, with appropriate faculty sponsor. Students should contact instructor or music department office for audition information. Analogously to private instruction in performance, Cornell faculty members and outside instructors offer private instruction in musical composition.  Students may register for these courses in successive semesters or years. Music majors are granted a waiver of lesson fees. Click here for more information.

MUSIC 4509: Topics in Electronic Arts (also ARCH 4509)
Staff. 3 Credits.

MUSIC 4601: Chamber Singers
S. Spinelli. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
A mixed-voice chamber choir for students with outstanding sightreading skills and considerable choral experience. Aims to rehearse at a professional level.

MUSIC 4615: Jazz Band
P. Merrill. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
Study and performance of classic and contemporary big band literature. Rehearsals twice a week with two to four performances per semester.

MUSIC 4616: Jazz Combos
P. Merrill.  1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
Study and performance of classic and contemporary small-group jazz.

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MUSIC 4621: Chamber Orchestra
C. Kim. 1 or 2 credits.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
The goal of this music performance course is to provide the opportunity for you as a string performer to come together with other like-minded musicians in an ensemble setting to rehearse and perform the highest quality literature from the chamber orchestra repertoire. In this course we will focus on overall concepts of self and ensemble expression, engagement, participation, and performance. We will also address musical concepts of ensemble and individual balance, blend, intonation, phrasing, dynamics, articulation, tone, rhythmic precision, color, and ensemble clarity. We are going to listen to ourselves, to each other and to the composer’s voice.

MUSIC 4631: Chamber Flute Ensemble
J. Pepinsky. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
Small ensembles meet weekly to explore diverse flute repertoire including a variety of instrumentation (piccolo, alto flute, bass flute). There will be a performance opportunity at the end of the semester on a chamber concert or in a studio class setting.

MUSIC 4641: Instruction in Gamelan Instruments
C. Miller. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Limited enrollment.
Concentrated instruction for students in advanced techniques of performance on Indonesian gamelan instruments.

MUSIC 4651: Chamber Music Ensembles
Coordinator: M. Yampolsky. 1 credit.
Prerequisite: successful audition.
Study and performance of chamber music works from duos to octets, for pianists, string, and wind players.

MUSIC 4901: Independent Study in Music
Staff. 1-6 credits.
Prerequisite: departmental approval; experience in proposed area of study.
Independent study affords students the opportunity to pursue special interests or research not treated in regularly scheduled courses. A faculty member, who becomes the student’s instructor for the independent course, must approve the proposed study and agree to provide continuing supervision of the work. Students must prepare a proposal for independent study; forms are available in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and Advising, 55 and 172 Goldwin Smith Hall.

MUSIC 4911-4912: Honors in Music
Staff. 8 credits per year.
Prerequisite: senior honors candidates.

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6000

MUSIC 6101: Analytical Technique (also MUSIC 4102)
Staff. 4 credits.
For description, see MUSIC 4102.

MUSIC 6201: Introduction to Bibliography and Research
B. Boettcher. 4 credits.
This course explores two necessary components for advanced study and research in the discipline of music:  1) practical research tools and methodologies, which introduces students to the many types of bibliographic tools, both printed and electronic; 2) critical approaches and theories of music, sound, performance, and cultural meaning, which introduces the students to key disciplinary and interdisciplinary intellectual movements and scholarly works.

MUSIC 6420: Electroacoustic Techniques
K. Ernste. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Intended principally for doctoral students in music composition but open to others by permission. The course presents a practical overview of both classical and state-of-the-art techniques for computer music including digital synthesis, signal processing and sound manipulation, analysis and resynthesis, spatialization, and real-time and/or interactive applications. Students will produce several short studio projects as well as one larger piece to be presented in a final concert.

MUSIC 6421: Electroacoustic Composition
K. Ernste. 4 credits.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Intended principally for doctoral students in music composition but open to others by permission. Depending on students’ backgrounds and interests, the course may include an introduction to electroacoustic composing, an emphasis on aesthetic issues associated with the field, interactivity and real-time performance, software instrument design, performance controllers, or other topics.

MUSIC 6509: Topics in Electronic Arts (also ARCH 6509)
Staff. 3 Credits.

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7000

MUSIC 7101: Topics in Tonal Theory and Analysis
Staff. 4 credits.

MUSIC 7102: Topics in Post-Tonal Theory and Analysis (also MUSIC 4103)
Staff. 4 credits.

MUSIC 7103: History of Theory
A. Hicks. 4 Credits.
This seminar investigates the history of fundamental concepts in music theory – e.g., pitch, pitch collections, consonance, dissonance, and harmony – and their connections to mathematical, acoustical, and philosophical thought from Greek and Roman antiquity through Rameau and the philosophes.

MUSIC 7111: Composition
K. Ernste. 4 credits.
This course will examine works from the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will also present and discuss their works either in class or through individual meetings. Concurrent with the seminar the Composer’s Forum will meet; the Forum will feature a guest speaker and is open to all students and faculty. Forum dates will be posted on the Department website.

MUSIC 7121: Advanced Orchestral Technique
Staff. 4 credits.
Intensive analysis of orchestral scores from the past hundred years, with an emphasis on modern instrumental techniques, gestures, and textures.

MUSIC 7201: Seminar in Medieval Music
A. Hicks. 4 credits.
Topics for Spring 2016: Medieval Persia
This seminar investigates the nexus of music, poetry, cosmology, and iconography in medieval Arabo-Persian culture from the Samanids (ninth/tenth century) to the Safavids (sixteenth/seventeenth century). Topics include: the valuation of music and musicians in Persianate court culture (as filtered through the lenses of court poetry, illuminated manuscripts, chronicles, etc.); musical cosmology, symbol, and metaphor in philosophical Sufism; and the development of ritualized “spiritual audition” (sam?’/sema) in its expansion across Central Asia. These topics will be situated within the broader framework of contemporaneous debates about the morality of listening within Islam. No knowledge of Arabic or Persian required.

MUSIC 7202: Seminar in Renaissance Music
Staff. 4 credits.

MUSIC 7203: Seminar in Baroque Music
N. Zaslaw. 4 credits.

MUSIC 7204: Seminar in Classical Music
Staff. 4 credits.

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MUSIC 7205: Seminar in Music of the Romantic Era
R. Moseley. 4 credits.
In Spring 2017 will explore the repertoire and culture of the piano throughout the nineteenth century. Focusing on composers, performers, and listeners, it will address the instrument’s shifting roles across amateur and professional contexts and private and public realms. Topics will include manifestations of virtuosity, the staging of improvisation, and the piano’s complex relationship with textuality via autographs, editions, transcriptions, and the notion of Werktreue.

MUSIC 7206: Seminar in Music of the 20th Century
Staff. 4 credit.

MUSIC 7211: Seminar in Performance Practice
Staff. 4 credits.

MUSIC 7213: History of Sound (also STS 7213)
B. Piekut. 4 Credits.
This seminar will investigate themes in the interdisciplinary area of inquiry known as sound studies. The focus of this class will be on historical rather than ethnographic approaches to sound; therefore, we will treat themes in sound studies from the perspective of music history and its attendant methodologies. We will, however, read some theories of the connections between material culture and sound that have emerged from the social sciences. These theoretical readings have been chosen because they are particularly suggestive for formulating historical projects. Rather than attempting a chronological history of sound, this syllabus groups the assigned readings around topic areas, allowing seminar participants to recognize sympathetic methodological concerns among disparate scholars, and to register important differences about how to research and write critically about the following subjects: acoustic instruments, places for hearing, electronic instruments, recording and reproduction, subjectivity, liveness/deadness, embodiment, listening, power, operatic/cinematic intersections, digitality, and soundscapes.

MUSIC 7221: Mozart: His Life, Works, and Times
N. Zaslaw. 4 credits.

MUSIC 7232: History and Criticism
A. Richards. 4 credits.

Music 7240: Film and Music
D. Yearsley. 4 credits.

Music 7260: Performance, Expressive Culture, and Globalization in the Americas (also AMST 4265, LSP 4260/6260, MUSIC 4260)
A. Madrid. 4 Credits.
Combining social and aesthetic theory in the study of embodied culture, the emerging discipline of performance studies provides a rich conceptual framework to understand a wide variety of phenomena, from activities that explicitly involve performance (eg. music, dance, theater, ritual) to discursive, social, and political performativity (eg. the construction of identities, the enunciative use of language, political activism, and the use of the body in everyday life). This seminar focuses on globalization and its impact on cultural production in the Americas, drawing on the particular insights of performance studies into these phenomena.

MUSIC 7301: Ethnomusicology: Theory and Methods (also MUSIC 4301)
C. Appert. 4 credits.
Open to graduate students in anthropology, linguistics, psychology, sociology, Africana Studies, Asian Studies, and other cognate fields by permission of instructor.
This course provides an introduction to ethnographic research and writing with a focus on their application in music studies. Students will critically examine the disciplinary history of ethnomusicology while exploring its methodological grounding in ethnography and musical analysis, broadly defined. In considering the possibility of a “musical anthropology” (Seeger 1987), we will interrogate textual, visual, and audio recording and analysis as practices of representation imbued with power and inflected by gender, sexuality, race, and class. Course materials include foundational texts in ethnomusicology, scholarly articles and chapters, ethnographic audio and visual recordings, and book length ethnographies.

MUSIC 7304: Imaging Music, Imagining Culture in Medieval Persia (also MEDVL 6307/4304, MUSIC 4304, NES 4304, RELST 4304)
A. Hicks. 4 credits.
This seminar investigates the nexus of music, poetry, cosmology, and iconography in medieval Arabo-Persian culture from, roughly, the Samanids (ninth/tenth century) to the Safavids (sixteenth/seventeenth century). Topics include the valuation of music and musicians, minstrels (mutriban) in particular, in Persian court culture (as filtered through the lenses of court poetry, illuminated manuscripts, and chronicles), musical metaphor and ritual in medieval Persian Sufism, and the development of “spiritual audition” (sama’/sema) in its expansion across Central Asia. These topics will be situated within the broader framework of contemporaneous debates about the morality of listening within Islam. No knowledge of Arabic or Persian required.

MUSIC 7306: Charles Burney’s Musical Travels
Yearsley. 4 credits.
The seminar is centered around one of the richest 18th-century texts concerning music: the three-volume diary published in the early 1770s by the English music historian and composer Charles Burney documenting his travels through France, Italy, Germany, and the Netherlands.  In addition to Burney’s diaries, we will read other travel writings of the period, as well as excerpts from the history of music researched by Burney during his European sojourns.  Drawing on both primary and secondary sources, the seminar will address themes such as music historiography, biography, cosmopolitanism, politics and music, and changing conceptions of travel and cultural exchange.

MUSIC 7310: New York Experimentalism
B. Piekut. 4 credtis.
This seminar will survey experimental music and performance in New York City during the 1960s and 1970s, work that was created in the space opened up by the artistic and conceptual innovations of John Cage and Ornette Coleman. Artists and movements will be drawn from the following list: Tony Conrad, Fluxus, Henry Flynt, Jazz Composer’s Guild, Judson Dance Theater, Allan Kaprow, loft jazz, Charlotte Moorman, Meredith Monk, no wave, Yoko Ono, Sun Ra, Carolee Schneeman, the Velvet Underground, and La Monte Young.

Music 7312: Vocality and Embodiment
J. Peraino. 4 credits.
The voice occupies a peculiar phenomenological position, on one hand emanating from material bodies and conveying that materiality with register, mannerism, grain, and break; on the other hand existing as disembodied sound waves, and an internalized sonorous Other. This course will explore the many cultural and conceptual approaches to the voice and its role in the production of music, language, desire, subjectivity, embodiment, and the human. Students will workshop projects developed within the course or already underway as part of a dissertation, article, performance, or recording.

Music 7315: Music in Urban Africa
C. Appert. 4 credits.
This course traces the ideological legacy of colonialism in the modernizing projects of African nation states and explores how African populations have at times appropriated, negotiated, and resisted this legacy through musical performance. Focusing on the postcolonial African city as a space of musical innovation and contestation, it critically examines the relationship between popular culture and historic and ongoing processes of urbanization. How has music in Africa provided a unique position of individual and communal articulation with (post)colonialism, nationalism, crisis, and global representation? How has music worked to empower or disempower certain populations, and what are the implications of its use in the interest of politics? How do frameworks such as cosmopolitanism and Afropolitanism expand or limit our understandings of popular musical cultures in Africa? Participants in the seminar will engage music not only from a lyrical perspective but also as a complex of aural signs that index tradition, globality, ethnicity, race, nation, and gender and that are constituted in the social relationships between performers and audiences.

MUSIC 7320: Listening and Audio Cultures (also AMST 7320, COML 6999, LSP 6320, SPAN 6320)
A. Madrid. 4 credits.
Focuses on the political economy of sound and listening in the configuration of urban space in Latin America and among Latino communities in the U.S. The city will be approached from a multidisciplinary perspective centered on the experience of sound and listening as a critical component in the performance of the social, cultural, political, and ethnic subjectivities and objectivities of the urban.

MUSIC 7330: Producing Diaspora: Cultural Dialogue in the Black Atlantic
C. Appert. 4 credits.
While traditional understandings of the African diaspora center on displaced communities of African-descended peoples in the Americas, emerging scholarship increasingly calls attention to the active role played by Africans in the production of the Black Atlantic world. Focusing on cultural practices as performative dialogues that reflect, create, sustain, and mediate diasporic connections, this seminar explores the intersecting and multidirectional transnational movements, both historic and contemporary, that define the Black Atlantic.

MUSIC 7340: Latin American Musical Modernisms
A. Madrid. 4 credits.
This seminar focuses on the development of modernist and avant-garde musical manifestations in Latin America vis-à-vis the development of larger modernist aesthetics throughout the world. Latin American and European musical manifestations will be critically examined in a comparative fashion. By taking into account the historical circumstances that gave birth to these forms of music as well as the power imbalances that have informed discourses about modernity, and center, and periphery, this seminar seeks to challenge the notion that modernisms in the margins are mere copies of European and American modernisms. Instead we will discover that “third-world” modernisms are “the flip side of Enlightened modernity.”​

MUSIC 7345: Historiography and Method in Latin American (Ethno)Musicology
A. Madrid. 4 credits.
This course provides an introduction to the development of the field of musicology, ethnomusicology, and music research in Latin America beginning in the late nineteenth century. Readings focus on particular periods, foundational authors from various regions and their works, and also the kinds of work being conducted by contemporary working in on Latin America. A large portion of the readings will focus on materials unpublished in English or little known to scholars in Anglo-American academia. The goal of the course is not only that students gain a better feeling for the cultural and historical complexities of the region, the unique issues surrounding Latin American music scholarship (including the blurry disciplinary boundary between musicology and ethnomusicology) but also that they understand different music scholarship initiatives in Latin America as both, responses to larger political and historical moments in the area and dialogues within larger transnational intellectual networks.

MUSIC 7350: Culture and Representation in Borderlands (also LSP 7350)
A. Madrid-Gonzalez. 4 Credits.
The borderlands are contact zones that could be defined geographically, politically, or even epistemologically as places where different cultures, lifestyles as well as understandings and experiences of the world meet and are constructed. Borders are highly contested sites and their representation plays a fundamental role in discourses of identity, from the national to the local and the personal. This seminar will engage a number of theoretical and ethnographic writings as well as cultural manifestations (music, films, literature, and TV shows) about the U.S.-Mexico border as well as other physical and cultural borderlands in order to contest the essentialisms that have controlled the representations of these areas and to show instead their fluidity and multi-sited nature. The seminar seeks to explore the borders as sites for opportunity and innovation in relation to transnational exchange, migration, and cultural flows.

MUSIC 7355: Critical Improvisational Studies
B. Piekut. 4 Credits.
This seminar will investigate the ways in which improvisation informs a vast array of human endeavors. The reading list will gather scholarship on improvisation from the widest possible range of perspectives, with contributions from those working in American studies, architecture, anthropology, computer science, cognitive science, cultural studies, dance, education, ethnomusicology, film, gender studies, history, literary theory, musicology, neuroscience, new media, organizational science, performance studies, philosophy, psychology, and sociology, among others. We will read some classic works in improvisation studies, but our focus will be on newer scholarship that represents state-of-the-art research in the area. Critical Improvisation Studies is a radically interdisciplinary field. Although we will recognize the important historical role played by music in the practice of improvisation, this seminar is intended to explore both musical and non-musical ways in which improvisation functions in culture. As a result, we will bracket many fine musicological contributions on specific historical moments or figures, in favor of more wide-ranging studies that collectively offer a new animating paradigm for scholarly inquiry.

MUSIC 7411: Sound Sculpture Seminar
Ernste. 4 credits
Sound Sculpture Seminar is a course exploring several meanings of “sound sculpture” including techniques for sound manipulation and formation, sound analysis and re-synthesis, sounds in space, as well as more concrete notions of intermedia artwork that makes sound. The course is intended for graduate students in music but open to others by permission of the instructor.

MUSIC 7501: Historical Performance
R. Moseley. 4 Credits.
Hands-on study of 18th- and 19th-century pedagogical materials relating to keyboard improvisation, from textless and unfigured Neapolitan partimenti to quasi-literary manuals aimed at amateurs. Keyboard ability (and willingness to improvise collaboratively) desirable but not essential.

MUSIC 7901: Independent Study and Research
Staff. Credit TBA.

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9000

MUSIC 9901: Thesis Research
Staff. Up to 6 credits each semester, TBA. S-U grades only.
Limited to doctoral students in music who have passed the Admission-to-Candidacy exam.

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