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Bailey Hall

Musicology Colloquium

The Musicology Colloquium series provides a weekly forum for presentation and discussion of recent research, by distinguished visitors and by Cornell faculty and graduate students in musicology and performance practice. Musicology colloquia take place on Thursdays at 4:30 PM in 124 Lincoln Hall, except where noted. All meetings are open to the public.

Thursday, March 23
   4:30 pm
Lincoln Hall 124

Erica Levenson (Cornell University) presents "Traveling Tunes: French Comic Opera and Theatre in London, 1714-1745."  Erica’s research focuses on the international circulation of popular theatrical music during the eighteenth century.

Thursday, March 30
   4:30 pm
Lincoln Hall 124

Sergio Ospina-Romero (Cornell University) presents "Dolor que canta: The life, the exile, and the music of Luis A. Calvo."  Ospina-Romero's research activities are mainly focused on popular music in Latin America in the early twentieth century, in relation to sound recording industries, mechanical reproduction, nationalism, transnationalism, cultural identities, and music consumption.

Thursday, April 13
   4:30 pm
Lincoln Hall 124

Don M. Randel Teaching and Research Fellows' Colloquium:  Anaar Desai-Stephens, "Bollywood Songs and South Asian Culture"; Ryan MacEvoy McCullough, "Musical Technologies and the Natural World"; and Mackenzie Pierce, "Improvisation and Social Change in the U.S."

Thursday, April 20
   4:30 pm
Lincoln Hall 124

Margot Fassler (University of Notre Dame) presents.  The Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Music History and Liturgy, Fassler is renowned for her work at the intersection of musicology and theology and is a specialist in sacred music of several periods.  At Notre Dame she holds joint appointments in Music and in Theology, and she is a fellow in the Medieval and Nanovic Institutes. 

Thursday, April 27
   4:30 pm
Lincoln Hall 124

 Mia Tootill (Cornell University) presents a lecture on her dissertation,  "From the Underworld to the Opéra: Representations of the Devil on the Parisian Musical Stage, 1827–69."  Her research centers on French opera, ballet, and popular theater in the long nineteenth century, and the subsequent emergence of silent film.

Thursday, May 4
   4:30 pm
Lincoln Hall B20

Westfield Center for Historical Keyboard Studies presents a conference, "Ghosts in the Machine: Technology, History, and Aesthetics of the Player-Piano," May 4-6.  Georgina Born (Oxford University) gives the keynote address.